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In association with The National Literacy Trust
Dads urged to get involved in their children?s story time to give boys a boost
Dads are being urged to get more involved in their children’s early literacy development after a new survey by the National Literacy Trust found that half as many fathers as mothers say they have the most influence over developing their pre-schooler’s literacy skills.

The report, Early literacy practices at home in 2015: Third annual survey of parents, shows that while more than a third of dads (36.6%) of children aged between three and five feel they have the most influence over their young child’s literacy development, significantly more mums (71.5%) said the same.

The National Literacy Trust’s survey indicates that the gender gap in reading starts early, with parents reporting that 70.6% of their pre-school daughters read stories daily, compared to 61.1% of their sons. Parents were also more likely to report that there are ‘no barriers to your child developing their early literacy skills’ if they had a girl (50.1%) than if they had a boy (43.1%). This points to an opportunity for fathers to be reading role models from the outset, as the influence of dads has great benefits for all children, in particular boys1. 

The survey of 1,000 parents, commissioned by the National Literacy Trust and carried out by YouGov, revealed almost a quarter (24.0%) feel that it is other adults who work with their child, for example teachers, who have the most influence on their child’s early literacy skills.  

The survey shows that during a typical week two thirds of children (65.7%) look at stories daily at home and the majority (62.9%) typically spend between five and 15 minutes doing this on any given occasion. The survey also found parental attitudes and behaviours towards reading were related to those of their children, with 37% of parents who are very confident about looking at or reading stories at home saying their child was very confident about doing the same. Only 5.4% of parents who say they are fairly confident reported that their children are very confident about looking at or reading stories at home.

www.literacytrust.org.uk

*Photos from Google Images
 
In association with The National Literacy Trust
Dads urged to get involved in their children?s story time to give boys a boost
Dads are being urged to get more involved in their children’s early literacy development after a new survey by the National Literacy Trust found that half as many fathers as mothers say they have the most influence over developing their pre-schooler’s literacy skills.

The report, Early literacy practices at home in 2015: Third annual survey of parents, shows that while more than a third of dads (36.6%) of children aged between three and five feel they have the most influence over their young child’s literacy development, significantly more mums (71.5%) said the same.

The National Literacy Trust’s survey indicates that the gender gap in reading starts early, with parents reporting that 70.6% of their pre-school daughters read stories daily, compared to 61.1% of their sons. Parents were also more likely to report that there are ‘no barriers to your child developing their early literacy skills’ if they had a girl (50.1%) than if they had a boy (43.1%). This points to an opportunity for fathers to be reading role models from the outset, as the influence of dads has great benefits for all children, in particular boys1. 

The survey of 1,000 parents, commissioned by the National Literacy Trust and carried out by YouGov, revealed almost a quarter (24.0%) feel that it is other adults who work with their child, for example teachers, who have the most influence on their child’s early literacy skills.  

The survey shows that during a typical week two thirds of children (65.7%) look at stories daily at home and the majority (62.9%) typically spend between five and 15 minutes doing this on any given occasion. The survey also found parental attitudes and behaviours towards reading were related to those of their children, with 37% of parents who are very confident about looking at or reading stories at home saying their child was very confident about doing the same. Only 5.4% of parents who say they are fairly confident reported that their children are very confident about looking at or reading stories at home.

www.literacytrust.org.uk

*Photos from Google Images